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in the fiscal cliff debate. tax rates spike and spending slashed. congress is breaking for the holidays in two weeks. it could send the economy spinning in directions. $1.6 trillion in tax hikes. he will travel to pennsylvania to sell it to you. republicans aren't buying it. listen to house speaker, john boehner. >> despite the claims the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. >> democrats are firing right back at boehner. harry reid getting a little personal. >> i don't understand his brain, so you should ask him. okay? >> ouch. athena jones live from washington. same old same old. where do we go from here? >> that's the big question. the nice talk after the election is pretty much gone away. you mentioned one of the big sticking points, that's taxes. republicans and democrats can't agree on how to raise the tax revenue? end the bush tax cuts for the wealthy, close the loopholes, raise the capital gains taxes or all of the above. right now, they can't agree on how much money should be raised on the revenue side. let's listen to
over that so-called fiscal cliff. tax hikes and spending cuts kick in if no agreement is reached between the house and republicans on how to close the budget gap. it has been more than two weeks since president obama invited the major players to the white house to discuss the situation. as of this morning, no new talks are scheduled. brianna keilar joins us. so many republicans say they are pessimistic about a deal happening in time to avert this fiscal cliff. some say it's for political reasons. what can you tell us? >> it may all be for political reasons. that's no surprise in washington. as you can seen through dealmaking not just on this but things in the past couple of years between the white house and congress, there is almost this rhythm that has evolved. both sides are pointing to the other for an impasse. republicans like senator lindeyy graham just slamming the white house and tim geithner for a plan he laid out on behalf of the administration, laying out about $1.6 trillion in new revenues coupled with only about $400 billion in medicare cuts. listen to what graham sai
. >>> call it the fiscal cliff follies, because with 28 days remaining before massive tax hikes and spending cuts kick in, democrats and republicans are ridiculing each other's ideas. it's a recipe for recession. the gop offering up its first plan which calls for $2.2 trillion in deficit savings over the next decade, including $800 billion in tax reforms, 600 million in medicare reforms and spending cuts. but the president rejected it outright because it does not contain tax hikes for the rich. time is running out. any sign of serious negotiation on the horizon? >> i'd say on the horizon, that would be fair. the log jam that you're watching, we're expecting to continued likely until next week. so don't be surprised if you see that. i think the policy prescriptions here, what needs to be done to find a package for deficit reduction are clear. right now you're watching the politics play out. all you need do is open your ears, listen to the white house, listen to congressional republicans you'll hear them playing the blame game. >> making vague promises about achieving revenue through capping d
some washington over the fiscal cliff. everyone's taxes go up. massive spending cuts take hold in just 29 days if the white house and congress can't reach a deal. and they are barely talking right now. abc's jon karl has the latest. good morning, jon. >> reporter: good morning, george. with less than a month to go, the two sides are as far apart as they have ever been. overnight, the president released a new campaign-style video aimed squarely at republicans. >> we need to get tax relief to working families. >> reporter: this morning, about the only thing that the two sides agree on is that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would be a big blow to the economy. >> it would be very damaging to average americans. there's no doubt about it. >> going over the cliff will hurt our economy, will hurt our job creation in our country. it's not fair to the american people. >> reporter: without a deal to cut the deficit, almost everybody's income taxes will go up january 1st. it's more than that. there will be automatic cuts to defense, to medicare doctors, to unemployment benefits. and that co
. >> good morning. >> reporter: good morning. it's about the "fiscal cliff" on wall street but we have a number of positive signals on the economy. consumer spending did pull back in october according to the commerce department by 2/10 this is the of a percent following an 8/10th of a percent of gain in the previous month. superstorm sandy depressed spending. unless holiday sales soar over the 4th quarter it's going to be tough for the economy to continue the gain of 2.7% that the commerce department reported in the 3rd quarter yesterday. stockton focused on any talks out of d.c. -- stock market focused on any talks out of d.c. on the "fiscal cliff." the dow over 13,000. pretty modest start to the day today. right now the dow is up by 5 points. nasdaq though falling by 3. s&p down by one. social game maker zynga getting hit hard after announcing it and facebook are changing their partnership. zynga down 7.5%, facebook down slightly. back to you. >> thank you, jason brooks with kcbs and cbsmoneywatch.com. >>> a tale of two uncomfortable pairings. first the san francisco 49ers with two s
slash that government spending, if and when the fiscal cliff goes into effect, that can really eat into gdp and is part of the reason the congressional budget office has said if we do go over the cliff, the u.s. could go back into a recession. carol? >> alison kosik at the new york stock exchange. >>> well, someone is waking up this morning as a multimillionaire. winning tickets for the powerball's record-breaking $580 million jackpot were sold in arizona and missouri. last night's winning numbers, if you're curious, 5, 23, 16, 22, 29 and the powerball number is 6. winners will split the largest jackpot in powerball's history. we know one of the tickets was bought around the kansas city area. but whoever won was really lucky, because the odds of winning, 1 in 175 million. you have a much better chance of getting hit by -- we say that every time. you know. the odds are long. lucky them, and we're happy for them. >>> journalist tom ricks is a star. not for his new book, not for his 17 years at the wall street journal, but for his 90 seconds on fox news. when asked about the attacks o
up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. like grover is stuck with this pledge he made everybody take which is that they have to go over the cliff because they obviously will not ever say the word tax. they will only say revenue. i'm stuck spe
] stuart: moving along, republicans counteroffer to president obama's solution to the fiscal cliff yesterday with a plan of 800 billion dollars in new revenue from tax reform, not from higher tax rates. plus, about a trillion dollars in spending cuts. speaker john boehner said the president's plan just wouldn't pass. unfortunately, the white house responded with their la-la land offer that couldn't pass the house. so basically they are at odds. david, here's what i've got, here's my calculation, rough back of the envelope, okay? when i can find the envelope. okay? it is president obama wants 800 billion dollars more in tax revenue from the rich in the form of higher tax rates. the republicans want about a trillion dollars more in spending cuts. david: uh-huh. stuart: the two sides are those dollar numbers apart. and you say what? david: i say i don't think the president cares if it passes the house. because if it passes, he gets everything he wants. he doubled the amount of tax income he wanted from the private sector because he wants many r in his proposal. -- he wants more in his
: a very different tone on capitol hill as fiscal cliff negotiations remain rocky. the president sent his top negotiator, treasury secretary tim geithner to meet with congressional leaders. afterward, house speaker john boehner said the white house had not proposed spending cuts needed to win critical republican votes. >> i have to tell you, i'm disappointed in where we are, i am disappointed in what's happened in the last couple weeks. >> reporter: senate majority leader harry reid fired back saying democrats put forward a serious plan and ridiculed boehner when asked about the argument that the ball is in the democrats' court. >> i don't understand his brain, so you should ask him. >> reporter: away from the hill, vice president biden took his own steps to push for fiscal cliff compromise, stopping in d.c.'s first costco. warning the economy could suffer greatly if lawmakers can't get a deal done. he proudly flashed his store membership card. >> i went to get my wife's card, she said no, no, no, get your own. >> reporter: according to sources at the white house and on the hill, treasury
. you can't do that in three weeks. >> so do you think we go off the fiscal cliff? >> no. all you've got to do -- you know what you've got to do on the tax side. that's simple. you have to palass a law that ss the law has to be overwritten. >> and what would be your position on that? >> i think it's the simple thing to do. obviously do what the president is saying, you know. he ran a campaign on it. the legitimacy of that. if you've got to act in three weeks, you're not going to revise the income tax code in three weeks. it may be perfectly legitimate. i think that both. personal and corporate need a lot of thought and a lot of revision. they're both broken. but you're not going to do that in three weeks. the challenge i see is in three weeks you've got to have some convincing balance of the tax side, the revenue side, with the expenditure side. it's inherent. you can't change the expenditures in three weeks. you can indicate intentions, but you can't -- >> what do you think happens then? >> i think you get some understanding about the kind of framework for dealing with the expenditure s
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10